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[READ ONLINE] Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us by Jesse Bering. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online. Recommended Bookz to Read read book online in pdf epub site. Online Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us by Jesse Bering Book in PDF Mobi or Epub . Perv The Sexual Deviant In All Of Us Jesse Bering perv the sexual deviant in all of us full online full online perv the sexual deviant in all of us pdf 29,10mb perv .

How is Chegg Study better than a printed Perv student solution manual from the bookstore? Our interactive player makes it easy to find solutions to Perv problems you're working on - just go to the chapter for your book.

Hit a particularly tricky question? Bookmark it to easily review again before an exam. The best part? As a Chegg Study subscriber, you can view available interactive solutions manuals for each of your classes for one low monthly price. Why download extra books when you can get all the homework help you need in one place?

Can I get help with questions outside of textbook solution manuals? You bet! Just post a question you need help with, and one of our experts will provide a custom solution. You can also find solutions immediately by searching the millions of fully answered study questions in our archive. Bering barely touched on the big perversions of our time right now, such as pedophilia although he does address adult attraction to teenagers, which the law still identifies as pedophilia if the teens are under the age of consent.

He focused a great deal on bestiality and certain fetishes, but not hair fetishes or BDSM. He provides no reason for why he hopscotched all over the realm of "perversions", so I have to chalk it up to sloppiness.

While not perversions by any means, Bering does nothing to address bisexuality or asexuality, orientations considered perverted by gay and straight people alike in the 21st century. Worst of all, Perv is the most transphobic book that a gay psychologist could ever write and somehow get away with. In quite a few areas of the book, Bering expresses a disgust toward "cross-dressing", "transvestites", and "drag queens". The only "fact" uncited that he provides about transgender people is that FtoM transgender people are more likely to identify as homosexual than heterosexual While Perv is entertaining, don't look here for theory or empathy Bering is no Andrew Solomon.

Jesse Bering, award-winning columnist and psychologist, wants to talk about perversions. We are deviants in one form or another; we may not be paedophiles, or into voyeurism and exhibitionism but there maybe something in our past we rather not discuss.

In Perv, Jesse Bering looks at the psychology of having a fetish outside the norm and compares it to the difficulties he faced growing up in the 70s and 80s as a gay man. Bering looks at cultural thought, imprinting, conditioning and compares them to his own struggles as a homosexual. While he looks at things like zoophiles, paedophiles and bestiality, he also looks at other perversions. Cross dressing, bondage, sadism and tries to get the reader to accept people as human.

As Bering states, sometimes they often feel like they have three options in life; depressive sleep, being institutionalised or suicide. Neither of these solutions seems effective at solving the problem. Especially a paraphilia that was so rare that no one bothered to find the Greek name for it. Not because I want to make fun of them, the whole thing is just fascinating.

My favourite paraphilia discovered from this book is auto-plushophilia look it up. This review originally appeared on my blog; http: View all 4 comments. Feb 05, Rae rated it did not like it. Boring, too long, and with no structure, this book tried to be open minded but adhered too much to biological and gender essentialism to fulfil that promise. It was very binarist spoiler alert: I felt like the author wrote on topics he'd randomly decided to research simply to show off his witty prose, without giving much thought to where he was going with the book what was his point?

Read as part of the Popsugar Reading Challenge - 'A book with a one-word title'. Also read as the March book for book club. Jun 19, Ben Babcock rated it liked it Shelves: Are you a perv? Of course you are, you pervy perv, you. The Sexual Deviant in All of Us. Jesse Bering grapples with that truism that the only normal is that there is no normal. He catalogues, comments upon, and otherwise investigates the various types of sexual behaviours that are or have previously been labelled as deviant.

This is the sixth! The inevitable comparison will be with Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex. Perv has a similarly journalistic tone to it but feels much more like a review of literature on the subject. Far from it, for Bering writes with a very accessible style.

Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us by Jesse Bering – review

He puts his identity, as a gay man, and his agendas up front so the reader knows the biases with which he approaches this subject matter. And ultimately, the tour that he takes us on is both fascinating and educational, albeit at times somewhat lacking in focus.

The specific acts that ended up in either of these categories have varied by time and place, but it was always fuelled by morality. People who sexed it up the right way were good, ordinary members of society; people who went off script were bad, immoral, and possibly possessed by demons.

As science became more popular and people began to refine the scientific method, its application to the study of human sexuality offered a new opportunity to recodify sexual behaviour through science. The medicalization of sexuality is ongoing. It has brought with it many great benefits, from the Pill, to that other pill, not to mention various ways to work around infertility.

Bering points out that the earlier ways of regulating sexuality were prone to inconsistency and arbitrariness. For example, the age of consent varies widely across countries and is based more in our morals than in any scientific consensus on when someone can consent to sex. That there should be an age, or some other marker determining when one is capable of consent, seems not to be in doubt—but no one seems to know how to quantify it in a way that will satisfy all of us.

If anything can offer up an answer, however, it might be neuroscience and our increasing understanding of how the brain works. The lesson here: So while we know ever more about the science behind sex and have better tools available to help us investigate it, we are still debating how to interpret the results. Perv spends a chapter or two discussing paraphilias and the various modes of attraction.

It is entertaining to read about the woman who married the Eiffel tower or people who become aroused by bees. The world of kink is so very diverse, and Bering does an excellent job of pulling back the curtain to help us understand that there are so many different obsessions, fixations, and attractions.

I appreciate the attempt to challenge the heteronormativity of our society. Probably the heaviest topic Bering addresses is pedophilia. Firstly, he delves into the way that the popular definition of pedophilia has expanded to cover things like hebephilia attraction to pubescents and the difficulty this causes in a medical context.

Related is the conflation with pedophilia and child sexual abuse not all pedophiles have abused children, and not all those who abuse children are actually aroused by children. Bering highlights the conflict between wanting to identify and study potential pedophiles and the consequences of a non-offending pedophile outing himself.

This is the dilemma we have: I only wish Perv had grappled a little harder with issues like this. But I could see people having a lot more trouble getting through this, or considering it dry, if they were looking for something a little more engaging. Each non-fiction book we read for the Banging Book Club offers its own unique window into sex and sexuality.

None of them have been a solid 5-star hit for me yet, but every one was interesting in its own way even if Vagina was somewhat disappointing by playing fast and loose with science. Jul 04, Young-In Soh rated it it was ok Shelves: First off, I would like interested readers of this book to know that this book is NOT academic writing. I am surprised this guy is a well-known columnist since he lacks the basic knowledge or importance of organizing information.

It was horrendous, and his constant merging of personal tales with academic data made me cringe What a let down this book was in that sense. I am quite interested in human sexual deviance and have read numerous books on the subject. I was expecting so much more from First off, I would like interested readers of this book to know that this book is NOT academic writing. I was expecting so much more from this book.

Though the author does make an attempt to explain different sexual deviances, he was unable to detach himself from the topic. He kept flaunting his sexual orientation throughout the book. As a heterosexual female, if I had done what he had throughout the book, most people would have called me an overly emotional woman who could not be academic at all.

So, yeah. That definitely rubbed me the wrong way. It pissed me off A LOT. How could people praise his writing skill It made me very upset. Good things about the book It was an easy read. He has a good sense of humor. I found myself smiling at times even though his writing skills kept making me cringe. This book does have a lot of information, and his insights aren't particularly BAD It turned me off completely.

I kept reading the book because I hate not giving a book a chance. That is how much of an avid book lover I am. Anyway, this book was offensive to me not because of the subject matter the author chose to speak about but in the manner he presented his case. If you really want to get a good understanding of sexual deviances, this book isn't necessarily the best book out there to do so. Feb 19, Penny rated it liked it Shelves: As Roy 'Chubby' Brown used to say before his shows - "If easily offended stay away".

Fascinating and irritating in turn.

Irritating in that I lost count of how many times Bering told us he was a gay man literally dozens and then we get some snippet from his life breaking into whatever subject he was currently writing about. Mind you, his early 'encounters' with an illustration of a Neanderthal in a picture book As Roy 'Chubby' Brown used to say before his shows - "If easily offended stay away".

Mind you, his early 'encounters' with an illustration of a Neanderthal in a picture book did make me laugh! And no, I'm not going to explain just what those 'encounters' were all about! Really not sure what to think about the story of Erika Eiffel, a woman who has had a relationship and 'married' the Eiffel Tower although I now understand they have split up and she's in a relationship with a crane! Maybe I should have expected this from a gay male author, but there's not nearly enough information about women and I saw this as a weakness in the book.

View all 5 comments. Oct 20, Nore rated it it was ok Shelves: An interesting enough read, but honestly there isn't anything in here that was new to me. I also spent most of this book waiting for him to really get into it and then, before I knew it, I was turning the last page. The whole book read like the opening paragraph of a college essay. Plus, Bering spends just about as much time talking about his personal experience with being an outlier as a gay man as he does talking about people with more unusual orientations, to the detriment of the actual facts An interesting enough read, but honestly there isn't anything in here that was new to me.

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Plus, Bering spends just about as much time talking about his personal experience with being an outlier as a gay man as he does talking about people with more unusual orientations, to the detriment of the actual facts he's presenting. I also cannot wait, can't wait at all , for people to stop referencing Freud like he knew what he was talking about.

Freud has been debunked over and over and over again through the years. Please, let him fade into obscurity. This is not a bad starting point for people who are interested but don't know how to approach the topic, as Bering provides a lot of resources in the back that can be used for further reading, but most of them are probably more interesting and definitely better organized than this was.

Jul 17, Julie G rated it it was ok Shelves: Writing I wasn't super impressed with the writing. On the one hand, the author does a great job of citing his sources, which makes me want to give him a standing ovation.

Unfortunately, the quality of the writing just didn't meet those same standards. I thought it was disconnected and didn't flow very well. I would be hard pressed to give a topic sentence or even chapter summary. Entertainment Value Call me close-minded, but I couldn't get past what seemed to be a large quantity of apologia for pe Writing I wasn't super impressed with the writing.

Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us

Entertainment Value Call me close-minded, but I couldn't get past what seemed to be a large quantity of apologia for pedophilia. I felt like the author let his desire to banish any arguments against homosexuality he is openly homosexual, as he reminds us continually color his objectivity. In an attempt to make sure no one can claim homosexuality is deviant, he goes too far in excusing all sexual deviancies, including pedophilia.

I just can't get behind that. It really turned me off to the book as a whole. Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with a copy to review. View all 3 comments. Some really interesting factoids to impress your friends with formicophiles, anyone? If you want to fall in love with the Eiffel Tower a very sexy momument or you're aroused by tablecloths, good for you. Just don't hurt anyone else in the process.

Unless they want you to eat them, of course, which is something else entirely, and Some really interesting factoids to impress your friends with formicophiles, anyone? Unless they want you to eat them, of course, which is something else entirely, and probably warrants a book in its own right Sep 14, Ahmed Salem rated it really liked it.

Nov 06, Emmy Gregory rated it it was ok. Hmm this is really quite interesting. No, I did not know that. With bees, you say? Well that's really remarkable and - what?

Stop misgendering everyone. Stop insisting that it's all some kind of weird fetish. Well that came out of nowhere. I think the trouble is that his interest in weird sexual fetishes means he can't really acknowledge that there's anything gender related that isn't driven by the libido.

People do get offended when you completely dismiss their lived experiences and insist that you know what's really going on, particularly if you're throwing some tired stereotype that has been used to bully, oppress and pathologise the marginalised group in question. That's not a trans thing. It's a people thing. People are touchy like that. You can't help but wonder about the quality of the research when his understanding of trans people is so shockingly awful - seriously a ten minute read up on this stuff would have improved matters.

I was enjoying the book up until that point but this really pissed me off and I'm not even trans. Dec 27, J. Absolute genius. This one is really a four-and-a-half star book. Readable and academic all at the same time, which is hard to pull off.

Here, Bering sets out to do what Foucault was trying to do in many ways: I'm not as ready as Bering to chalk things up to evolutionary adaptation, but even here he makes some good Absolute genius. I'm not as ready as Bering to chalk things up to evolutionary adaptation, but even here he makes some good points. The only thing thing that stops this from being a five-star book is a structural issue: I get that every assertion needs to be qualified when walking a minefield like sexuality, and that illustrative examples are always a good idea, but the amount of footnoted material got overwhelming even for me, and I read academic work constantly.

Still, the conversational tone pulled me through. Oct 14, Angus McKeogh rated it liked it. Pretty interesting stuff. The cited research demonstrating that humans are essentially born with not only a sexual preference male, female, both, or neither as well as an internal sexual identity was basically reinforcing information I was already aware of. However it's also been demonstrated that the age range of who a person is sexually attracted to is innate in our genetics; moreover, the person or objects that others are sexually attracted to is also imprinted in genes and stamped into our Pretty interesting stuff.

However it's also been demonstrated that the age range of who a person is sexually attracted to is innate in our genetics; moreover, the person or objects that others are sexually attracted to is also imprinted in genes and stamped into our behavior early in life. So overall there was some really fascinating information about human sexuality but ultimately the book circled around pedophilia and lots of homosexual issues which sort of lost me.

Not sure what I expected was reading it for a book group but I definitely expected something slightly different. Sep 25, Denis Ferreli rated it it was amazing. This is an important book on a sensitive subject. I liked how Bering was knowledgable about all sides of the debates but also unrelenting in his search for rational and humane understanding of "deviants" which as he shows is not always an easy to define category when it comes to sex.

I thought the writing was brilliant in this book and even bordering on literary in places. For a science writer he has an unusual rhetorical ability and is a master prose artist.

Overall if you're not afraid to go i This is an important book on a sensitive subject. Overall if you're not afraid to go into some dark places, a must read for human nature buffs. But don't be too put off by that anyway because he manages to keep the tone light and highly readable throughout.

The humor is self-effacing, sharp and actually caught me off guard in a number of places! Oct 10, Jane Fenn rated it it was amazing. Jesse Bering, however, achieves a cheeky. May 21, Kathleen Brugger rated it it was ok.

It makes me depressed to see Scientific American published this book. The style was so sleazy—joking and smart-ass—plus the point of view was odd in a number of ways. Under whose rules? There's no discussion of who made up the rules. Our culture needs to have an adult discussion about our ridiculously Puritan attitudes toward sexuality, but this book will be of very little help in getting it started. Nov 03, Marjorie rated it did not like it.

This book doesn't really cover anything new. Too much of a focus on paedophiles. Poorly organized. The author almost completely ignores women despite the title saying the book is about the perv in us all. Bonk by Mary Roach is a much better book on this subject. This was both dirty and clinical at the same time Bering is a paedophilia apologist and I can't believe I didn't properly realise the extent of this book's trashness before.

I don't have the energy to unpack everything that is wrong with this book. The short of it is that Bering's understanding of consent is abysmal and he constantly misrepresents the positions of people he disagrees with, often setting them up as irra cw: The short of it is that Bering's understanding of consent is abysmal and he constantly misrepresents the positions of people he disagrees with, often setting them up as irrational and overly emotional in order to undermine them.

For example: I actually think I hate this book. I came in with an open mind; my interest piqued after hearing about it from the Banging Book Club.

Unfortunately, it was so poorly structured and haphazardly researched that it read like the findings of someone who studies sexology as a hobby, not as an academic. The crux of his argument is that sexual deviancy should be condemned on the basis of harm caused—to the deviant and the sexual partner—and not our level of disgust toward the act or desire. This is a really interesting framework to look at this issue.

Bering tries his best to come across as progressive and cover himself when he makes a sweeping claim that he knows has harmful implications.

There was a lot of rape and paedophilia apologism. A lot. I anticipate some people might say I missed the point of the book when I call this out. Well, at least to him. For some reading on this issue I recommend Asking for It: I hear Martha Roth also has some interesting ideas about sexual fantasies and harm in her book Arousal: Bodies and Pleasures , though I haven't read it yet.

He does not knowledge the full spectrum of gender and makes definitive statements about things he has never experienced and will never understand. Bering is obsessed with the notion of biological sex and has trouble separating the notions of gender and genitalia. He also makes several gynophobic remarks at different points throughout the book. He also admits that the study has never been replicated, yet he still stands unwaveringly it.

I say this having listened to the audiobook as it comes across in his tone of voice. Bering falls into the trap of what a lot of sexually progressive people do: He also treats asexuality as an absolute, not a spectrum, and ignores other diverse sexualities like pansexuality.

This strikes me as odd because he is willing to extend the label of sexuality to paedophilia but has no time for this.

A huge red flag for me quite early in the book was how highly Bering thinks of Alfred Kinsey. Then, in another chapter he explains that we can never really tell if someone is enjoying being tickled.

I did find his point about the inconsistencies in our animal cruelty laws interesting e. Interesting but unconvincing seems to be my reaction to a lot of his arguments. He constantly makes asides, jokes and comments which detract from his arguments and make his writing more disjointed.

In the audiobook version you could hear how pleased he was with himself for coming up with certain quips and bits of wordplay. Bering also spends a lot of the book mocking religion.

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It was often apropos of nothing and almost never added anything to the discussion. If you want to make those comments by all means write a book on theology which he has , but this is a book about sexuality and not your gripes with the concept of a higher power. Funnily enough, Bering himself is very absolute, almost preachy, and mocks those who disagree with him on anything.

Nothing is up for negotiation. Again, I really wanted to like this book and pushed through to finish it, trying to give him the benefit of the doubt, but the further I got the harder it was to continue.

I think he is better suited to writing short think pieces or witty op-eds and I imagine he would be an interesting person to hear speak. I did come away having learned to check my judgement of others' fetishes. I agree that harm should be the key factor in when we denounce behaviour as immoral.

I just think that I see a lot more harm where Bering doesn't. Dec 08, Rachel rated it liked it. I think this review is probably for adults only, due to the nature of the book, so I'm giving it an R rating. The overall premise of the book is that we shouldn't be so judgmental about other people's private sexual peccadilloes, give that they don't affect us directly.

Who cares what consenting adults do in bed, as long as no one is being hurt? Which isn't always true of consenting adults - the author uses the example of a man who wanted to be killed and eaten and found a cannibal fetish guy t I think this review is probably for adults only, due to the nature of the book, so I'm giving it an R rating. Which isn't always true of consenting adults - the author uses the example of a man who wanted to be killed and eaten and found a cannibal fetish guy to do so - both consenting, but clearly murder is not legal.

I agree with the author that it's none of our business what other people get up to and also any of us might be deemed a pervert if our sexual lives were examined closely. However the author doesn't take into account the handful of people who insist on making their sexual fetishes public knowledge. And if you insist on leading your wife around on a leash or making your husband wait on you hand and foot at the cocktail party, other people will notice and disapprove, because those behaviours are well outside the realm of normal.

But let's say you are entirely private about your perverted sexual life. Sure, it'd be nice if society was less judgmental when such fetishes do emerge into the public sphere, usually without the consent of the person in question. But the examples the author uses are just terrible. Not many people would dare to stick up for pedophiles, although he does correctly point out that they aren't necessarily choosing to be attracted to children. It is a compulsion.

As long as they don't actually harm children, they probably deserve sympathy and treatment rather than hatred and calls for punishment. You can't punish someone for a thought or sexual fantasy. However the author considers downloading and view child pornography to be a victimless crime. That is ridiculously untrue.

Child pornography is documentation of a crime that actually happened. Would he be so quick to defend postcards of lynchings of black people, which were not uncommon well into the 20th century? After all, postcards aren't lynchings. But they could not exist without the crime itself, and the lynchers profited by selling those postcards. The law recognizes that photographic evidence of a crime being committed can't legally be sold.

That is profiting from crime. In the case of child porn, it's remarkably callous of the author to suggest that viewing child porn isn't actually hurting children. Without the lucrative market in child porn which funds many other crimes, including terrorism , there would be far less child rape.

If we only had to deal with the handful of criminally-minded pedophiles, not an international supermarket of child porn, it'd be much easier to stop the abuse of children. The author is no more reasonable about zoophiles, practitioners of bestiality. He uses several flawed logical arguments, the first of which is that we butcher animals and do a lot worse to them than have sex with them.

This is true, but you can't justify wrongdoing by pointing to other wrongdoing. It's like saying "too many bad things are done to animals, why bother stopping any of them? Or maybe he is saying it's unfair to punish zoophiles while we let butchers practice their trade? But people don't need to have sex with animals to survive. Eating meat is more or less essential. Sure you can get by without meat, but it's been a part of our diet for thousands of years and that is why we have domestic animals.

Cows and chickens don't exist in the wild. They were domesticated to provide food. Hardly the same motivation for wanting to have sex with animals. He also suggests that masturbating a horse is no worse than collecting semen from a stud by electroshocking the prostrate. That sounds quite painful but it's not all that common in the horse world.

Very few horses are used for breeding purposes; most male horses are geldings. Even the ones that are used for breeding, it's far more common for breeding to happen in the usual way, or for semen to be collected via other means such as a dummy horse or cow sprayed with hormones.

The electroshock method is used only a small number of high-priced successful racehorse studs. Probably less than are attacked by zoophiles every year. And once again, if electroshocking the prostrate is wrong, that doesn't make masturbating a horse right. It's not a mutually exclusive situation. Both acts can be wrong. Finally, the author points out that we don't know whether or not animals actually enjoy sex with humans and maybe they would give consent if they can speak, after all, if a horse is masturbated to its natural conclusion, surely that means the horse enjoyed it?

And with just a few sentences, the author completely eliminates the very notion that men can be raped. If a man has an erection, he should enjoy sex with whoever happens to come along, male or female, doesn't matter, he has an erection, therefore, he desires sex. It's like the author completely eliminates the notion of mechanical friction causing a sexual reaction even if it's not wanted. Likewise, female rape victims who experience orgasm must have enjoyed it, right?

I mean, who doesn't like orgasms? Women who experience orgasm during rape also experience a great deal of guilt and shame, while men who have been raped typically don't even report it.

Both see themselves as complicit because they apparently "enjoyed" it even though biologically, their bodies were simply on autopilot responding to mechanical friction. This is the exact same reasoning criminal pedophiles use: He wanted it.Combining cutting-edge studies and critiques of landmark research and conclusions drawn by Sigmund Freud, Alfred Kinsey, and the DSM-5 , Bering pulls the curtain back on paraphilias, arguing that sexual deviance is commonplace.

As kinky as it is compassionate, illuminating, and engrossing, Perv is an irresistible and deeply personal book. Now you can read online or Download This book for free. The best part? Archived from the original on January 12, They lusted instead for the species that had reared them. You bet! Find your local bookstore at booksellers.